What is a Palindrome in Math? Definition and Examples


What is a palindrome in math? In math, a palindrome, also called palindromic number, is a number that reads the same from right to left and from left to right. For example, 767, 9, 321.123, and 8008 are examples of palindromes.

Notice that single-digit numbers and decimals can be palindromes. 

If you read 9 from left to right, you get 9 and you read 9 from right to left you still get 9.

Can a negative number be a palindrome?


A negative number cannot be a palindrome. For example, -61716 is not a palindrome. If you read -61716 from left to right, the negative sign is on the left. However, if you try to read the number from right to left, you will get 61716-

Since we never put a negative sign on the right of a number, -61716 is not a palindrome.

More examples of palindromes

22

33

55

66

77

88

99

101

202

444

242

969

1030301

10501

87966978

54100145

40000004

502101205

Recent math words

  1. What is an abacus? Definition and Chinese Abacus

    Jan 18, 22 08:00 AM

    What is an abacus? Learn quickly and easily to use an abacus to do math.

    Read More

  2. Width of an Object

    Jan 17, 22 09:15 AM

    What is the width of an object? Definition, explanation, and easy to understand real life examples.

    Read More

Enjoy this page? Please pay it forward. Here's how...

Would you prefer to share this page with others by linking to it?

  1. Click on the HTML link code below.
  2. Copy and paste it, adding a note of your own, into your blog, a Web page, forums, a blog comment, your Facebook account, or anywhere that someone would find this page valuable.
Share this page: